Flip UltraHD – An HD Vidcast in Your Pocket

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The amazing Flip UltraHD.

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USB mics and handheld audio recorders for audio, and now The Flip for video – all New Media legends.

As I record, the Flip is taking consumer and citizen journalism (not to mention entertaining videos) to new heights. A small, solid state device that records SD or HD video and can slip into your pocket. No cables to carry or software to load. Just ‘Flip’ open the side and a USB port appears.

The ingenious embedded software suite stays right with the camera! Mix clips, add transitions and backing tracks with a few mouse clicks.

We continue to use the great little Flip Mino with its internal battery, but the Ultra series (2x AA batteries) appealed to me even more since off-the-shelf batteries can be popped in any time. The Mino uses the USB connection for charging too.

I just had to try the little UltraHD. Besides the small issue of stabilization, any of the Flips are winners.

While my Panasonic pro camera can’t be replaced, I just don’t always have it with me like the Flip. Slip it in your pocket and you’re ready to catch video on the go.

Listen in as Laura makes an appearance and we talk Flip.

Street price at record time – $199

Drop me a line, any time with comments, thoughts and suggestions:
mark at newmediagear dot com

Follow Studio1A on Twitter!

…or, drop me a line with comments, thoughts and suggestions:
mark at newmediagear dot com

Best,
MarkJensen
Sig

SoundByte, TapeLinkUSB, SoundTrack Pro and an iMac

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SoundByte cart emulator from Black Cat Systems.

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Admittedly, this is an “all-in-one” podcast. I normally like to pick a piece of gear or a topic and stay (somewhat) on track.

Since the last cast, Studio1A (at least the Studios) have gone all Mac. I’ve tried that before, but just last week made the extra commitment of adding an iMac to our Mac Pros. This show is the first in some time that wasn’t created with my old favorite, Sony Sound Forge and an XP laptop. Today, I used Apples Sound Track Pro on the iMac along with SoundByte, which replaces BSI WaveCart as our main cart emulation, used mostly to play the intro and outro in real time.

Directly above this post is the Alesis TapeLinkUSB writeup. I also talk about the TapeLinkUSB during this show.

Join me as I break in the new hardware and software.

Talk soon…

Street price at record time – $199

Follow Studio1A on Twitter!

…or, drop me a line with comments, thoughts and suggestions:
mark at newmediagear dot com

Best,
MarkJensen
Sig

Alesis TapeLink USB

Podcast and New Media Gear is here…
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The Alesis TapeLink USB allows you to directly digitize your cassette library.

There is something magical about audio tape. Maybe it’s the sound of saturation, or the challenge of finding the brand and type of tape that squeezes the most dynamic range and frequency response out of a cassette deck or reel-to-reel. How about the smell of isopropyl alcohol on a q-tip – methodically cleaning tape residue from those small and delicate tape heads.
…or maybe the droning buzz of a bulk eraser; music to my ears

Don’t get me wrong – I’d never trade in my hard disk (or solid-state storage) for studio recording. A few things I don’t miss about audio tape are the drop-outs, servo-induced jams and the inherent limitations of a mechanical linear transport.

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, many of us have cherished memories on cassette tapes. Some (I won’t name names) have hundreds of ‘mix’ tapes. How cool were mix tapes? I still have a few made for Laura.

As we step back into the 21st Century, most of us have long forgotten the cassette. The folks at Alesis have not. The TapeLink USB is an ingenious device. Dust off your cassettes, plug the dual-transport (only side B records) TapeLink into a USB slot and you’re ready to digitize those memories onto your PC, without converting to analog first.

The TapeLink looks like a 90’s era dual-deck from the front panel. The standard transport buttons are all there along with an index counter to let you know ‘about’ where you are on the tape. DNR (dynamic noise reduction – no Dolby), a CRO2/Metal switch for tape formulations and the ability to dub at normal or high-speeds.

On the back of the TapeLink, you’ll find standard RCA phono connectors if you want to go analog. What sets the TapeLink apart is the USB connector. Plug the supplied USB cable into your PC or Mac and you’re ready to digitize those tapes at 44.1 or even 48kHz, 16-bit.

The best part about the TapeLink is the included software. On the CD, you’ll find the well respected BIAS SoundSoap SE application to ‘re-master’ your old works of art. Also included is the freeware audio editor Audacity and EZ Tape converter.

As a package, the TapeLink offers an effortless means of transferring old media to new. My only disappointment is the lack of Dolby noise reduction. However, the inclusion of SoundSoap makes up for it.

If you have a library of cassettes, don’t hesitate to capture them now. Tape is subject to deterioration over time, so your library will never sound better than it does today.

Check out the unique Alesis TapeLink USB and preserve those memories.

Street price at record time – $199

Drop me a line, any time with comments, thoughts and suggestions:
mark at newmediagear dot com

Best,
MarkJensen
Sig

Studio Monitoring on a Budget

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Compact and inexpensive monitors. The M-Audio AV20’s are a true bargain.

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Looking for a great set of inexpensive, powered studio monitors? The M-Audio AV-20 Studiophile speaker system is well worth a look …and listen.

In Studio1A, we are fortunate to have some great reference monitors for auditioning. That isn’t the case when I’m away from the studio. The AV20’s were able to fill a gap in listening ‘off-site’ with my laptop. These powered speakers plug directly into your laptops 3.5mm line out. Unlike may other over-inflated specs, the manufacturers quote of a 5 watt amplifier is very believable. The clean 5 watts from these speakers will light up a room with no problem.

These won’t replace $1000-plus studio monitors, but they work wonders in the field (and in the office.)

Have a listen as we check out the M-Audio AV20’s. Great for everything from casual computer speakers to on-the-spot checks of recordings…

Street price at record time – $79

Drop me a line, any time with comments, thoughts and suggestions:
mark at newmediagear dot com

Best,
MarkJensen
Sig